Remember: you know your child best. If you have a feeling that "something is just not right," trust your instinct. Ask for a referral to a specialist or seek support from your local autism experts at TouchPoint Autism Services. We can help you understand your child's symptoms and behaviors and connect you to the support that you need.

Information for Parents


If you suspect your child may have symptoms of autism or Asperger's Syndrome, review this checklist and share it with your doctor today. Discuss the signs and symptoms you've noticed. Early intervention is the key to successful treatment of autism spectrum disorders - it's important that you move quickly if you suspect any developmental delays.

  • Does your child make consistent eye contact with you?

  • Does your child respond to his/her name?

  • Does your child become preoccupied with play & ignore others?

  • Does you child often line things up & get upset if they are moved?

  • Does your child take interest in other children (non-siblings)?

  • Will your child look at an item to which you point?

  • Is your child overly sensitive to noise, taste, sensation or light?

  • Does your child flap his hands, rock his body, or spin himself or objects?Does your child repeat sounds, words, or phrases?

  • Does you child point at objects to show interest?

  • Does your child get upset by minor changes?

  • Does your child give unrelated answers to questions?

  • Does your child have obsessive interests?

 

How to Talk with Your Doctor About Autism

When visiting your pediatrician for a well-child visit, there are so many topics to discuss…but if you have questions or concerns about symptoms of autism or Asperger's that you have observed, use these tips to speak candidly with your physician.


1.  Share this checklist and the signs you have observed

2.  When you describe the symptoms, use specific examples: "She never babbles," or "She doesn't turn to look at me when I call her name."

3.  Don't compare your child with other children - you doctor may assume your child is just developing a little differently and try to soothe you instead of clearly understanding what you are observing

4.  Talk about specific challenges - tell your doctor about problems your child might be having at school, or share any times that you fear your child might hurt himself or others.

5.  Be persistent - if you have concerns, don't take "no" for an answer. Early intervention is key…and further screening with a neurologist or developmental pediatrician can confirm your suspicions or alleviate your concerns. Your child's health and your peace of mind are worth the effort.

6.  Feel free to ask questions when you present the checklist:

  •     Are there tests available for autism?

  •     Who conducts them?

  •     Should I pursue an assessment?

  •     Can you refer me to experts in the diagnosis and treatment of autism?



7.  Understanding healthcare terminology can be overwhelming for anyone. If you don't understand words or phrases your doctor uses, ask him to rephrase in words you can understand.

Remember: you know your child best. If you have a feeling that "something is just not right," trust your instinct. Ask for a referral to a specialist or seek support from your local autism experts at TouchPoint Autism Services. We can help you understand your child's symptoms and behaviors and connect you to the support that you need.